Maine Mysteries: The Drowned Ghost Town of Flagstaff Lake

Maine Mysteries: The Drowned Ghost Town of Flagstaff Lake

Katie Bavoso explores a town that had to be flooded in order to make way for progress, but pieces of it still remain. Follow along in this episode of Maine Mysteries.

Moosehead Lake Maine | Scuba Diving

Moosehead Lake Maine | Scuba Diving

This is a short scuba diving video that was filmed on Moosehead Lake, Maine between Spencer bay and Lily Bay.

10 Drowned Towns You Can Visit

10 Drowned Towns You Can Visit

Drowned towns, flooded places and sunken cities due to natural disaster, flood and many other reasons are presented in this top 10 series.

Diving in Eastport, Maine

Diving in Eastport, Maine

A brief introduction diving in Eastport, Maine, along Passamaquoddy Bay.

Maine Mysteries: The Disappearance of Riceville

Maine Mysteries: The Disappearance of Riceville

In her latest story in her Maine Mysteries series, Katie Bavoso explores what caused a tannery town in Maine to collapse. Riceville was an unincorporated but bustling village around a leather shoe tannery in central Maine. In 1900, Riceville proper had 75+ people living in it. But by 1910 it was empty. Legend has it, a group of people came to town to do business one day and found everyone dead. What really happened to the people of Riceville?

Swimming in the Lincoln Maine lake part 1

Swimming in the Lincoln Maine lake part 1

I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)

Northern Lobsters of Maine | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD

Northern Lobsters of Maine | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD

In the north Atlantic, the American Lobster is the undisputed king of crustaceans. It's also a tremendously important commercial catch. While all the other fisheries are collapsing, why are lobsters resisting the trend? Jonathan goes out with a Maine lobsterman to learn why, and he dives down below to find the biggest lobsters he has ever seen. This segment won a New England Emmy Award! (This is an HD upload of the same segment posted previously in SD) ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The American Lobster may not look all that tasty, but this large crustacean that was once considered a nuisance by catch is now considered a delicacy around the world. Although they are shipped to restaurants everywhere, they come from the cold waters of the North Atlantic, mostly from New England and Eastern Canada. I want to find a really big lobster, so I've come to Eastport, Maine, right on the Canadian border to hunt for a monster! I'm wearing my super warm drysuit, to search for lobsters in the cold 50-degree water. Lobsters hunt at night, so they like to hide in holes in the rocks during the day. This is what you normally see of a lobster during the day—just a couple of claws sticking out of its den. With some gentle prodding, the lobster will come out to defend its turf. Lobsters are extremely territorial and often fight each other for prime dens. I have to be very careful of the claws. If this lobster gets hold of my hand or fingers it can easily break them. Note that this lobster has a larger claw on the left side. This is called the crusher claw. The other is the pincher or ripping claw. The crusher claw tells us this lobster is left-handed…er---clawed. When a lobster gets this big, it demands respect! Maine is the lobster capital of the US, and Boothbay harbor is one of the most popular places to visit if you want a fresh lobster dinner. Outside MSA It’s also the home of the Maine State Aquarium, where I’m learning a little bit about the life cycle of lobsters. I’m venturing behind the scenes in the Bigelow Laboratory where they conduct research on lobsters. Researcher Aimee Hayden-Roderiques introduces me to some of the unusual lobsters in their collection. Now most lobsters are not red - that's the color they are when they're cooked. In the wild, lobsters are more this color, sort of an olive-y color, maybe with a little bit of green and some orange. Now, every once in awhile, however, you'll come across a lobster that looks like this. This blue coloration is an extremely rare pigmentation found one in every three million lobsters. And I have to say, they are cool! Now, if you want to talk about rare genetic variations, this one takes the cake. This one is called a bi-color lobster and you can see that the color is divided right down the middle, one side's blue and the other side's kind of a pale yellow. These bi-color lobsters are so rare only one in every 100 million of these are born this color. That is one rare lobster. This female lobster has something very special going on. If you look underneath her tail, it's full of eggs. The female incubates thousands of eggs under her tail for up to a year before they hatch, and then when it's time for them to hatch, she releases the eggs out into the water, they hatch with little larvae that swim off into the water to become planktonic lobsters. A few hundred years ago, lobsters were incredibly abundant. Back then, lobsters were considered cheap food for poor people. How times change! Lobstermen catch lobsters using a simple trap, the design of which hasn't changed much in a hundred years. The coast of Maine is ruggedly beautiful, but the inshore areas are a labyrinth of lobster buoys, each connected to one or more traps. Todd checks each trap for “keepers” - that is lobsters that are legal size and throws back the shorts and other by-catch like crabs. Because this is done by hand, none of the short lobsters or by-catch is harmed. In the next trap, Todd finds a female lobster with a notch in her tail. The V-notch was put here by a fellow lobsterman so that everyone will know she’s a good breeder, and let her go. This is how lobstermen protect the future of the industry by ensuring that there are always lots of egg-laying females out there. My time as an apprentice lobsterman taught me how hard these guys work for a living, and I also learned how efforts like V-notching have made lobstering one of the few fisheries that really makes an attempt to ensure the long-term viability of the species.

Lost Logs

Lost Logs

Ride a long with Bruce Loring as he harvests logs from the bottom of the Penobscot River near Old Town.

MYSTERIOUS Places That DISAPPEAR Underwater!

MYSTERIOUS Places That DISAPPEAR Underwater!

Check out thes mysterious places that disappear underwater! This top 10 list of amazing locations in the world just vanish under water during high tide and reappear during low tide! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "STRANGEST Artifacts Ever Discovered!" video here: https://youtu.be/gG0XGt3jFZA Watch our "SECRETS Casinos DON'T Want You To Find Out!" video here: https://youtu.be/hAoABuvzOZM Watch our "RAREST And Most EXPENSIVE Cars In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/MtCnWSqqilg 10. Passage Du Gois The Passage Du Gois is a natural 2.5 mile long road on the Atlantic coast of France, which is often named as one of the most dangerous roads in the world. The stone paved route connects the Île de Noirmoutier with the coastal town of Beauvoir-sur-mer, and has been used since the 16th century. 9. Curio Bay If there’s one thing we know about New Zealand, is that it’s home to some stunning landscapes!! Especially when the Lord of the Rings movies came out, but one of its lesser known places is also one of its most amazing. 8. St. Michael’s Mount St. Michael’s Mount is an island to the South West of England, which is home to a medieval castle and church- the sort of place you’d expect to see in Game of Thrones! The island got its name because it is said that St. Michael appeared to a group of fishermen in the year 495 to warn the fisherman of certain peril! 7. East Quoddy Lighthouse East Quoddy Lighthouse is on Campobello Island, New Brunswick. In the 1820’s, trade between the island and the coast of Maine flourished, and it became a hive of activity for fishing and shipbuilding. The only problem was that the shallow waters in the region were treacherous for the boats, so the lighthouse was built to warn sailors that they were getting close to land. 6. Mont Saint Michel Mont-Saint-Michel is one of the most popular tourist attractions in France, and became a UNESCO world heritage site in 1979. The sanctuary is surrounded by medieval walls, with a series of buildings and towers that rise above the base, and the ancient abbey that stands over it all. 5. The Manjuyod White Sandbar Have you seen those images of bamboo huts sitting on stilts above the ocean? Well the Manjuyod White Sandbar is one of those places. It’s in the Philippines and, while being just as stunning, it is a cheaper option for tourists than the more famous sites like the Maldives. 4. Canadian Mural If you’ve ever looked out across a bay and thought the endless mass of grey concrete was rather depressing, then you might just change your mind after seeing the Bay of Fundy. The bay lies between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in Canada. It’s claim to fame is that you here you can experience the highest tidal range on earth, with the distance between low and high tide being as much as 52 feet. 3. Angel Road Angel Road is a stunning stretch of sand that can be found near the port of Tonosho, which is on the Shodoshima Island in the Seto Inland Sea of Japan. It connects the mainland with three smaller islands that lie close by but, because of the tides, the road is only revealed twice a day when the sea level is at its lowest. 2. Jindo Island Every year, on the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula, something amazing happens. It attracts hundreds of thousands of people, both locals and tourists, and is a mass celebration. Known as the Jindo Sea-Parting festival, a natural phenomenon occurs that sees the northern part of the East China Sea open up to reveal a 1.8 mile pathway that connects Jindo Island with its neighbouring island of Modo. 1. Green Lake This is perhaps by far, the most amazing place that vanishes underwater. The Green Lake, in Tragoess, Austria, is normally only about 3 feet deep for most of the year. Visitors go to see the beautiful scenery, and to sit on benches next to the water to enjoy the tranquillity. There are small bridges to cross streams, and it looks like a perfect scene for a landscape painting. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!

The City of Portland, Maine is Going Underwater!

The City of Portland, Maine is Going Underwater!

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