Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the ankle. High ankle sprain •A high ankle sprain is a sprain of the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula at the ankle. •Diagnosis of syndesmotic injury is usually done by the use of external rotation stress view examination or CT scan. This patient may require surgery. Anterolateral impingment •Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous (bony) pathology. •Soft tissue thickeneing commonly seen in athletes with prior trauama that extends into the ankle jint. •Arthroscopy of the ankle may be helpful . •Tibisl bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. Osseous (bony) spur on the anterior lip of tibia contacting the talus during dorsiflexion. The patient may need debridment of the spur. Ankle sprain •Pain that is anterior and around the fibula can usually be attributed to a ligament sprain. •Sprains result from the stretching and tearing (partial or complete) of small ligaments that can become damaged when the ankle is forced into an unnatural position. •Treatment includes immobilization, ice therapy, physical therapy and rarely surgery. •With ankle sprain, the patient will be able to walk, but it will be painful. With a fracture, the patient will be unable to walk. Pain that is posterior to the fibula can usually be attributed to an injury of the peroneal tendons. Lateral ankle pain •Patients with peroneal tendon problemes usually describe pain in the outer part of the ankle or just behind the lateral malleolus. •Problems mainly occus in the area where the tendons of the two muscles glide within a fibrous tunnel . Peroneal inflammation/ tendonitis •Tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces causing pain and swelling. •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Usually occurs secondary to an ankle sprain with retinaculum injury. •Occurs with dorsiflexion and usually eversion of the ankle. Posterior anle pain Achilles tendonitis •Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. •Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. •Achilles tendon can become prone to injury or rupture with age, lack of use or by aggressive exercises. •The Thompson test is performed to determine the presence of an Achilles tendon rupture. A positive result for the thompson’s test is determined by no movement of the ankle while squeezing of the calf muscles. Posterior ankle impingment •Os trigonum or large posterior process of talus (stieda syndrome) •Common among athletes such as ballet dancers. •May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •Compression or squeezing on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms of pain and numbness on the medial area of the ankle. •When conservative treatment methods fail, surgical treatment or tarsal tunnel release surgery may be needed. Posterior tibial tendon tears are one of the leading causes of failing arches (flatfoot) in adults. •Too many toes sign •Loss of medial arch height •Pain on the medial ankle with weight bearing Arthritis of the ankle joint •Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. •Can usually be easily diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. Osteochondral lesion of the talus •Arthroscopic debridment may be necessary. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - Sign to Facebook and click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/

Sprained Ankle Ligaments *Home Treatment Guide!*

Sprained Ankle Ligaments  *Home Treatment Guide!*

http://www.michiganfootdoctors.com/twisted-ankle-recovery-time/ ‎ Curious to know what exactly you injured in your ankle? Well these are the types of injuries you can have and exactly what to do about them! http://www.michiganfootdoctors.com/

Treatment for Ankle Sprain or Twisted Ankle

Treatment for Ankle Sprain or Twisted Ankle

Source: https://www.epainassist.com Ankle sprain or twisted ankle is an injury which occurs when the ankle is rolled, turned in an awkward manner resulting in tearing or stretching of the ligaments which help in stabilizing the ankle bones together. Know the causes, symptoms, treatment of ankle sprain or twisted ankle. Information Source: http://www.epainassist.com/sports-injuries/ankle-injuries/ankle-sprain

Ankle Ligaments Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Ankle Ligaments Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the ankle ligaments. The ankle joint is made of three bones, the tibia, the fibula and the talus. The tibia is the major bone of the lower leg which bears the majority of the body weight. At the angle, the bump of the tibia forms the medial malleolus. The fibula is the smaller of the two bone of the leg. The lateral end of the fibula forms the lateral malleolus. In the ankle joint the talus articulates with the tibia. The talus is involved in multiple movements of the foot. There are ligaments in the ankle that provide connections between the bones. Injury to any of these ligaments may occur when the foot twists, rolls or turns beyond its normal motion. An ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs in sports as basketball and soccer. The deltoid ligament is on the medial side. It is formed of four parts: anterior tibiotalar part, tibionavicular part, tibiocalcaneal part and the posterior tibiotalar. The superficial deltoid arises from the anterior colliculus. The deep deltoid arises form the posterior colliculus and the intercollicular groove. The deltoid ligament is the main stabilizer of the ankle joint during the stance phase. The deltoid ligament is rarely injured by itself and it is usually associated with fractures. There are 3 lateral ligaments of the ankle joint: The anterior talofibular ligament (weakest): origin: 10 mm proximal to the tip of the fibula. Extends from the anterior inferior border of the fibula to the neck of the talus. The posterior talofibular ligament ( strongest): origin from the posterior border of the fibula. Inserts into posterolateral tubercle of the talus Calcaneofibular ligament: origin anterior border of the fibula 1 cm proximal to the distal tip. Inserts into the calcaneus distal to the subtalar joint and deep to the peroneal tendon sheath. The lateral ligaments are the most commonly injured ligaments in the ankle. The ligament of the syndesmosis •Anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament •Interosseous ligament •Posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament The connection of the tibia and fibula is called the syndesmosis. High ankle sprain = syndesmosis injury 5-10%. Injury of the ligaments above the ankle. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC

Medial Ankle Ligaments

Medial Ankle Ligaments

Ankle Pain Complete Overview - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Ankle Pain Complete Overview - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the anterior compartment of the foot, and the injuries and conditions associated with the ankle. There are many structures present at the anterior aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the anterior ankle 1-Anterolateral impingement: Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous pathology. Soft tissue thickening commonly seen in athletes with prior trauma that extends into the ankle joint. Tibial bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. 2-Arthritis of the ankle joint: Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. Can be usually diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. 3-Osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: Chip type fracture that usually occurs with severe ankle sprains. Causes pain, swelling, and stiffness of the ankle joint. X-rays, Ct scan or MRI are commonly used for the diagnosis. 4-Tibialis anterior tendonitis 5-Anterior tibialis tendonitis: It is an overuse condition common in runners. Common injury that usually accompanies anterior shin splints. If this tendon is strained, pain and tenderness will be felt upon active dorsiflexion or when the tendon is touched. There are many structures present at the medial aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the medial ankle 1-Posterior tibial tendonitis or rupture: Posterior tibial tendon problems can occur from overuse activities, degeneration and trauma. The posterior tibial tendon is one of the major supporting structure of the foot. The tendon helps to keep the arch of the foot in its normal position. When there is insufficiency or rupture of the tendon, the arch begins to sag and a flatfoot deformity can occur with associated tight achilles tendon. This occurs distal to the medial malleolus. This area is hypovascular. It presents with painful swelling on the posteromedial aspect of the ankle. Patient is unable to perform a single leg toe raise. 2-Tarsal tunnel syndrome: It is compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel. The flexor retinaculum covers the nerve. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is similar to compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. Causes include ganglia, accessory muscle and soft tissue mass. 3-Flexor hallucis tendonitis: Pain, swelling, weakness posterior to the medial malleolus. Dorsiflexion of the big toe may be reduced when the ankle is placed in dorsiflexion. Triggering and pain along the tendon sheath may also occur with toe flexion. It often occurs in activities such as ballet dancing, in which plantar flexion is necessary. 4-Rupture of the deltoid ligament: The deltoid ligament are the primary stabilizers of the ankle joint. The deltoid ligaments provide support to prevent the ankle from everting. An isolated eversion sprain with tear of the deltoid ligaments is a rare injury. There are many structures present at the posterior aspect of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Common injuries and conditions around the posterior ankle 1-Posterior ankle impingment (os trigonum): It is nonunited piece of accessory bone seen posterior to the talus. It is common among athletes such as ballet dancers. Tenderness in the posterolateral aspect of the ankle posterior to the peroneal tendon especially with passive plantar flexion. May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. 2-flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis: It is a condition associated with ballet dancing, in which extreme plantar flexion is necessary. Swelling and pain posterior to the medial malleoulus. Triggering with toe flexion. Dorsiflexion of the big toe is less when the ankle is dorsiflexed. 3-Achilles tendonitis: Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. Usually treated with therapy and injection. Do not inject inside the tendon, rarely treated with surgery. 4-Achilles tendon rupture: Achilles tendon can become prone to rupture with age lack of use, or by aggressive exercise. Rupture is diagnosed by the Thompson test and MRI. Treatment may be conservative without surgery by using a cast or a boot , however the rerupture rate is high. Surgery is done by approximation of the torn ends, however there is a risk of infection, skin and wound complications with surgery. There are many structures present at the lateral side of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Diagnosis of these injuries can be confusing and many of these injuries can be missed.

How to rehab an injured ankle

How to rehab an injured ankle

Everything you need to know about fixing football's most common injury How to get a scan: 0:29 How to test range of movement: 2:56 Functional assessment tests: 4:00 Rehab exercises: 5:30 SUBSCRIBE: http://fft.sm/6lZeN3 WEBSITE: http://fft.sm/XLBtaK Follow FourFourTwo Performance on: Instagram: http://fft.sm/TfnkQl Facebook: http://fft.sm/UXATZS Twitter: http://fft.sm/HcBNn9 Follow FourFourTwo on: Twitter: http://fft.sm/IVvx5C Facebook: http://fft.sm/8h27Gv Google+: http://fft.sm/tBDyjD Snapchat: FourFourTwoUK

Exercises for Ankle Joint Ligament Injury & It's Recovery Period

Exercises for Ankle Joint Ligament Injury & It's Recovery Period

For the Ankle Joint Ligament Injury to heal completely and in the fastest possible time, it is imperative to do the following exercises, which is shown in the video diligently. In post ankle joint ligament injury, there is substantial swelling and reduced range of motion of the ankle. Learn about the exercises and recovery time for ankle joint ligament injury. Also Read: https://www.epainassist.com/sports-injuries/ankle-injuries/ankle-joint-ligament-injury Follow us: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Epainassistcom-370683123050810/?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/ePainAssist G+: https://plus.google.com/+Epainassist Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/epainassist

Achilles Tendon rupture ,tear, tendonitis - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Achilles Tendon rupture ,tear, tendonitis - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video discribing the Achilles Tendon rupture, the etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic tests, the thompson test, and treatment options. Common causes of injury: •Repetitive or sudden increase of stress on the tendon. •Increase in exercise intensity. •Not allowing recovery time between exercises. •Decreased range of motion-tight calf muscles. •Bone spur-rubbing against the tendon. Two most common types of injury 1-Achilles tendonitis Chronic inflammation due to •Stresses •Micro-tears •Inflammation and scar formation May lead to: •Pain in the back of the heel •Occasional swelling due to thickening of tendon •Often occurs in runners. Treatment includes •Anti-inflammatory •Physical therapy. •Massage therapy •Ice therapy •Immobilization •Injections: prolotherapy, platelets or needling. 2-Achilles tendon rupture What happens when the tendon ruptures? •Patient will feel or hear a “pop” when the tendon ruptures. •Pain is felt in the back of the ankle. •Foot becomes floppy and weak. •Patient feels as if being kicked in the back of the ankle where the tendon snapped. The Thompson test Thomspon test is a clinical evaluation test used to assess the integrity of the Achilles tendon with the patient lying prone on the examination table; the examiner will squeeze the calf muscles of the affected leg. Slight plantar flexion of the ankle is a normal response to this examination when there is no presence of a rupture. However, if the Achilles tendon is ruptured, there is no plantar flexion or movement of the ankle and responds to squeezing of the calf muscle. Surgery is done by exposing the torn tendon through an incision in the skin .the ends of the tendons are cleaned and approximated. Once the tendon has been cleaned, repair of the ruptured tendon can be done with sutures. The Thompson test is once again performed to check the integrity of the Achilles tendon. After repair, a cast or splint is used for forty-six weeks postoperatively then physical therapy is initiated.

5 Steps to Ankle Pain Relief

5 Steps to Ankle Pain Relief

Dr Saran's 5 Steps to Ankle Pain Relief Ankle is an intricate network of bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Strong enough to bear your body weight, your ankle can be prone to injury and pain. You may feel ankle pain on the inside or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the muscles in your lower leg to your heel bone. Although mild ankle pain often responds well to home treatments, it can take time to resolve. Severe ankle pain should be evaluated by your doctor, especially if it follows an injury. Here are 5 steps to pain relief. Keep training Dr Saranjeet Singh drsaranjeet@gmail.com

Top Videos -  loading... Change country
Load 10 more videos